Airedale Terrier: All You Need to Know About This Breed

In times dog police and intrepid hunter, the Airedale Terrier is the largest of the Terrier breeds, bringing together all the characteristics of this group of dogs. Many may see him as a little devil, but his charm also makes up for any stubbornness or desire to master. Loyal and courageous, your greatest pride is to protect the family.

Airedale Terrier: All You Need to Know About This Breed

The Airedale Terrier is called by the fans of the breed as the King of the Terriers, not only for the size of this dog, superior to those of his group, but also for being considered the smartest and smartest. Features that can play to your advantage if the owner is prepared for his strong and somewhat impertinent personality.

If you are looking for a malleable and submissive animal, which responds immediately to each command, the Airedale is not the right one. This dog needs, above all, great doses of patience and a firm leadership, but also affectionate.

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE AIREDALE TERRIER

Some Airedale Terriers are somewhat dominant, with a tendency to challenge both other animals and family members if they consider them submissive. For this reason, you should be trained early to ensure that there are no relationship problems at home.

Agitated and with great hunter instinct, he needs proper exercises and jokes on a regular basis, or he can become destructive. In addition to this, it is a dog that likes to gnaw and dig, so if you have the opportunity, you will see in your furniture and garden easy targets.

STAGES OF THE AIREDALE TERRIER’S LIFE

AIREDALE TERRIER PHYSICIST

The Airedale Terrier has a square appearance with a rectangular head, well proportioned and without wrinkles. The eyes are small, dark in color, and the V-shaped ears fold to the sides. The tail is high insertion, steep and may or may not be cut. The medium-length coat, with a hard, thick, wire-like texture, is black in the saddle, upper neck and tail, and fire-colored in the rest of the body.

AIREDALE TERRIER TEMPERAMENT

Balanced, confident, docile and intelligent, the Airedale Terrier rarely exhibits aggressive behavior, making it a great companion dog, even for families with children.

He is also usually friendly with strangers, as long as they are in the company of the owners, otherwise he is able to defend his territory relentlessly, with loyalty and courage.

Like many Terriers, it is independent, stubborn and stubborn, and may disobey if it has not been educated since childhood.

AIREDALE TERRIER HEALTH PROBLEMS

BONES

  • Lympho-femoral dysplasia.

ENDOCRINE SYSTEM

  • Hypothyroidism.

STOMACH

  • Gastric torsion

SKIN

  • Dermatitis and eczema.

EARS

  • Otites.

 

CARING FOR THE AIREDALE TERRIER

FUR

  • Brush twice a week, trim excess hair every two months and take it twice a year. The beard of the Airedale Terrier should be washed daily to remove debris from food or accumulated dirt.

SKIN

  • To prevent skin problems, offer you a quality diet, based on omega 3 and 6 and fatty acids.

EARS

  • Keep your ears clean and dry to prevent infections by using a cotton swab moistened with a pH-balanced product.

 

ORIGIN OF THE AIREDALE TERRIER

It owes its name to the Valley of the Air, in Yorkshire County, which saw the birth in the mid-1800s of a breed created from crosses between Otterhound and some types of Terriers such as Old English Black and Tan , now extinct. At the time, the goal was to get a dog able to hunt otters, rats and other small animals in the water. Its original name was, incidentally, the Waterside Terrier.

Later, during World War I, the breed was one of the first to be trained to work with the army, serving as messenger, sentinel, food bearer and ammunition, as well as assisting Red Cross victims.

CURIOSITIES ABOUT THE AIREDALE TERRIER

It was a dog of this breed that inspired the Canadian writer Margaret Marshall Saunders to write, in 1893, the book Beautiful Joe , about the history of an Airedale Terrier that suffered from mistreatment. The recognition of the work contributed to the worldwide awareness of animal cruelty.

Of the various breeds of dogs that have ever been to the White House, the Airedale Terrier was one of the most famous. Laddie Boy was the pet of President Warren Harding, and around 1920, he accompanied him everywhere, from meetings to sympathy events to golf games.